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Assiniboine Community College

Campuses

5

Enrolment

  • 3273

    Full-time
  • 4251

    Part-time
  • 150

    International
  • 775

    Apprentice
  • 1078

    Indigenous

Assiniboine Community College (ACC) has been providing exceptional learning experiences for over 50 years. For staff and students alike, ACC offers unparalleled learning environments and responds well to the demands and requirements of the Manitoba labour market. Instructors follow the philosophy of ‘learn by doing’, combining theory with hands-on learning inside classrooms, labs, kitchens, shops, fields and the college’s Sustainable Greenhouse.

ACC has more than 40 unique diploma and certificate programs across a range of disciplines including food and hospitality, business, agriculture and the environment, health and human services, trades and technology. Additionally, the institution also provides apprenticeship programming in a variety of skilled trade disciplines.

The college welcomed over 3,200 full-time students last year. With campuses in Brandon, Dauphin and Winnipeg, ACC provides comprehensive education opportunities throughout Manitoba. The college also partners with many communities and organizations across the province to deliver customized education and training.

Fast Facts

  • 96% of recent graduates seeking work have found employment.
  • The average gross annual salary of our most recent graduates is $44,050.
  • 94% of recent graduates choose to stay in Manitoba.
  • We’re in the middle of a relocation and expansion to our North Hill Campus, a site once home to the Brandon Mental Health Centre. Some buildings date back 100+ years.
  • Our annual provincial economic impact is measured at $613 million.

Our research specialization:

  • Food Security and Sustainability
  • Bioenergy and Energy Consumption
  • Fruit and vegetable breeding for Canadian Prairie conditions
  • Greenhouse design and food production in cold climates

This is how we...

Contribute to our Community

ACC works extensively with communities across Manitoba to deliver programs, often in health care and trades disciplines, as well as mature student high school programming. One strong illustration of the college’s impact is through its partnership with Sandy Bay First Nation.   For more than a decade, the college has offered mature student high school programs in the community, which is about 150 kilometers from the nearest ACC campus. Recently, the partnership between the ACC and Sandy Bay First Nation has grown to include college preparation programs and construction safety programs.  In several recent training programs, there have been many more applications than spots available. A new Applied Building Construction program, which got underway this past summer, filled with 15 trainees, but more than 60 were interested—including 30 who wrote a test to apply.  ACC grads are now filling jobs and leadership roles in Sandy Bay First Nation, and the community is asking for even more programming, from health care aid and nursing to plumbing and electrical. Current students are even working on an addition to the Sandy Bay childcare facility, opening up the possibility of provincial licensing.

Foster Student Success

Manjumol Abraham

Over a year ago, Manjumol Abraham left her home in Kerala, India, and flew more than 13,000 km to Dauphin, Manitoba to study at ACC.  Now, with two awards and a new job, Abraham credits her education for a “wonderful experience” and a new opportunity in Canada.  Abraham graduated in June 2015 from the Comprehensive Health Care Aide program at ACC’s Parkland Campus. She says her ultimate goal is to go on to become a registered nurse. Abraham is currently working full-time at the Swan Valley Lodge in Swan River, Manitoba.  “I am very glad to say that people are very nice here and I like it here,” she said. “It is a different culture from my country, but I love it.”  Out of the 15 students in her class, five were international students, studying alongside 10 Canadian students.

Ruby Anne Chartrand

ACC alumna Ruby Anne Chartrand has received a national nod of recognition for her dedication to early childhood care.  She was recently given the Prime Minister’s Award for Excellence in Early Childhood Education, an annual award that honours early childhood educators from across Canada who display exceptional talent in encouraging early development skills of children under their care.   “I felt overwhelmed and honoured to receive this award,” said Chartrand. “I didn’t even know I had been nominated, so it came as a complete shock when I got the call… I’ll never forget it. Nothing will top this for a long time.”  She travelled to Ottawa to accept her Certificate of Excellence. The distinction came with a $5,000 cheque, which was shared equally between Chartrand and ‘Children for the Future’ Aboriginal Head Start program where she is currently employed.  Chartrand began working towards her diploma in 2008 and graduated in 2012.

Matt Tolton and Will Turner

Two Agribusiness students are smiling ear to ear after being awarded first place in an annual provincial business competition and walking away with a cash prize and bragging rights. Matt Tolton and Will Turner represented ACC at the 2015 Manitoba New Venture Championships held in Winnipeg.  Their plan, titled Central Plains Railway Corporation, outlined repurposing an existing, but currently unused, railway branch line that runs from Rathwell to Nesbitt in Manitoba. The idea was that the line could be put back into business and used to move producer and elevator cars. Their business model also included storing railway cars, grain drying and grain storage.  The pair faced off against 11 teams comprised of undergraduate students from other colleges and universities in Manitoba. Tolton and Turner are the only ACC students to have ever participated in the competition.

Partner with Business and Community

Industry

In 2009, ACC began collaborating with MTS TV Stories From Home, giving students in the Interactive Media Arts (IMA) program the opportunity to work with industry professionals while refining their skills to produce original, local documentaries to be seen by a wide audience.   MTS TV executive producers visit ACC each September to meet students in the IMA program and to hear their documentary ideas. In December, the college hosts an annual MTS TV Pitchfest where second-year students each have three minutes to share their story idea to a panel of industry professionals. Two to four documentaries are then chosen for production.   MTS TV provides a licence fee that is distributed among the student teams as a working budget and payment. The films are produced from January to April and then unveiled at a premiere event. They’re then broadcast on MTS TV’s ‘Stories From Home’ video on demand service.

Community

ACC has fostered a partnership with Habitat for Humanity, bringing together its pre-employment Carpentry, Construction Electrical and Piping Trades programs.   Instructors build the construction of a new Habitat home into the curriculum each year, giving students practical, hands-on experience in their field. The collaboration brings many people together, allowing students to develop their skills while making a meaningful contribution to the community.  The first Habitat home was completed in the spring of 2014. The goal is to build a new home over the course of each academic year, starting every September. The Brandon Chapter of Habitat for Humanity supplies the materials and floor plans with the home being built on site at the college’s North Hill Campus. Once complete, the homes are moved to their permanent locations in Brandon.  Students also meet the partner family they’re building a home for, gaining a powerful sense of purpose for their efforts.

Support Indigenous Students

Diversity contributes to the wealth of Indigenous knowledge at ACC where we aim to ensure a sense of belonging while valuing and celebrating success. More than 18% of certificate and diploma students studying on campus or by distance identify as First Nations, Métis or Inuit.  We strive to provide exceptional learning experiences through hands-on, affordable education in an environment that is warm and friendly with a strong sense of community. We believe it’s important to assist students in both their academic and personal growth.   Our Cultural Centre welcomes individuals from all cultural backgrounds. It is a place to drop-in and relax, visit, learn and study. Counsellors are available Monday through Friday. Our Visiting Elders Program has Elders from the Dakota, Ojibway, and Métis nations who provide cultural guidance, teachings, historical information, traditional knowledge, direction and support to all students. ACC is a proud signatory of CICan’s Indigenous Education Protocol. Diversity contributes to the wealth of Indigenous knowledge at ACC where we aim to ensure a sense of belonging while valuing and celebrating success. More than 18% of certificate and diploma students studying on campus or by distance identify as First Nations, Métis or Inuit. We strive to provide exceptional learning experiences through hands-on, affordable education in an environment that is warm and friendly with a strong sense of community. We believe it’s important to assist students in both their academic and personal growth.   Our Cultural Centre welcomes individuals from all cultural backgrounds. It is a place to drop-in and relax, visit, learn and study. Counsellors are available Monday through Friday. Our Visiting Elders Program has Elders from the Dakota, Ojibway, and Métis nations who provide cultural guidance, teachings, historical information, traditional knowledge, direction and support to all students. ACC is a proud signatory of CICan’s Indigenous Education Protocol.

Date modified: 2016-10-26