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Durham College

Campuses

2

Enrolment

  • 9604

    Full-time
  • 700

    Part-time
  • 514

    International
  • 1200

    Apprentice
  • 203

    Indigenous

At Durham College, the student experience comes first. With campuses in Oshawa and Whitby, Ont. along with a learning site in Pickering, the college offers more than 140 market-driven, full-time post-secondary programs in areas including culinary, hospitality, tourism, farming, horticulture, business, information technology, science, skilled trades, renewable energy, emergency services, technology, health, manufacturing and automotive.

Home to more than 30,000 students, the college shares its Oshawa campus with the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), and offers more than 60 academic pathway opportunities to transfer to UOIT. It also has partnerships with many Canadian and international colleges and universities to give students opportunities to obtain transfer degrees.

The Whitby campus features the Centre for Food (CFF), Durham Region’s first post-secondary presence focused on field-to-fork. Supported by celebrity chef Jamie Kennedy, the CFF houses Bistro ’67, a full-service, green-certified restaurant supported by farm fields, a greenhouse, an apple orchard and a pollinator garden. It also offers Pantry, a retail store featuring food prepared by the college’s culinary students. The CFF can accommodate 900 students studying in culinary, hospitality, event management, food science, agricultural and horticultural programs.

The Whitby campus is also home to the Skills Training Centre, a leading facility in preparing apprentices and skilled trade students for a wide range of positions.

Durham College’s Office of Research Services, Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ORSIE) is responsible for driving innovation and, since its inception in 2009, has created a strong applied research agenda for DC. That agenda allows students to participate in experiential learning opportunities that better prepare them for employment and gives professors the opportunity to keep their knowledge current and re-engage their interests. In addition, it provides the college’s community partners with viable solutions to meet their needs and strengthen their position in the marketplace.

Fast Facts

  • Durham College (DC) has been ranked among Canada’s top 50 research colleges for research income by Research Infosource Inc., for three consecutive years.
  • Durham College is home to 523 international students, representing 51 countries from around the world.
  • Durham College offers more than 450 pathway opportunities where students can earn both a diploma and degree, including more than 60 opportunities to transfer its campus partner UOIT.
  • DC’s Centre for Food is Durham Region’s first post-secondary presence focused on the field-to-fork philosophy, which is based on the harvesting, storage, processing, packaging, sale and consumption of local food.
  • Durham College has been ranked as one of Greater Toronto’s Top Employers for six consecutive years.

Our research specialization:

  • Agriculture and Agribusiness
  • Contextually Aware Devices or Enabling Technologies
  • Renewable Energy Technology
  • Advanced Manufacturing/3D printing (Rapid Prototyping)
  • Healthy and Resilient Communities

This is how we...

Contribute to our Community

Durham College students, employees and graduates have a significant impact on the economic and social well-being of the communities they serve. The college is widely viewed as a community builder because of the many dozens of partnerships it has with local businesses and organizations; the tens of thousands of graduates working in the local economy; and the countless hours its employees spend volunteering their time for non-profit organizations.

There are few, if any, areas of the community that are not impacted by the college. Over the past seven years, the college has added more than 40 new programs in high-demand and emerging areas of study, and membership in its Program Advisory Committees – made up of industry leaders – is now at more than 1,000.

In addition, a third-party review found that in 2012-2013 the college had an economic impact of $816 million on its local community, Durham Region. Finally, the college offers Corporate Training Services, which delivers high-quality, consultative, results-driven training to organizations and individuals across Ontario. This training provides the skills necessary for organizations and their employees to stay current and competitive.

Foster Student Success

Russ Montague

DC alumnus Russ Montague successfully discovered a way to convert his love of pop culture and his work experience with companies such as MuchMusic into multiple entrepreneurial endeavours. He took the skills he learned while attending Durham College’s Advertising – Administration program and parlayed them into two successful companies. ShirtPunch offers customers in 96 different countries the opportunity to purchase a newly designed T-shirt at a low price. Each shirt is available for 24 hours only, increasing the exclusive nature of the design. The company has received endorsements from several celebrities including icons like director Kevin Smith and Marvel creator Stan Lee, and has had substantial licensing opportunities with large brands such as Star Wars and Star Trek. Nerd Block is a subscription-based company which offers subscribers in 21 countries a box of five to six toys and collectibles and an exclusive T-shirt every month. Learn more.

Debbie Low

Durham College (DC) alumna Debbie Low was honoured on the provincial stage, winning a Premier’s Award for her passion for sports and dedication to empowering Canadians who live with a disability. A 1985 graduate from the college’s Sports Administration program, helping individuals with disabilities inspired Low to make a significant impact in the athletic community and helped her stand out amongst other provincial nominees. Since graduating from DC, she has implemented numerous programs, along with developing the operational plan for Canada’s team at the 2004 and 2008 Paralympic Games. Over the past 10 years, she has remained a leader in the sports industry as CEO of the Canadian Sport Institute of Ontario (CSIO), as well as serving on committees and boards for many not-for-profit organizations that support the success of athletes with a disability. Learn more.

Sarah Lavergne

While she was a first-year student, Sarah Lavergne, who has since graduated from Durham College’s Culinary Skills program, won gold in the Cooking category at the 20th annual Skills Canada National Competition (SCNC) and claimed the national title one month after winning gold in Culinary Arts category at the Ontario Technological Skills Competition (OTSC). SCNC is an Olympic-style multi-trade and technology competition that annually welcomes more than 500 competitors from across the country to compete in more than 40 trade and technology categories. Sarah’s golden result gave the college its sixth national medal in as many years. Learn more.

Partner with Business and Community

Industry

Durham College is very fortunate to have a long and rewarding partnership with Ontario Power Generation (OPG), which operates two Nuclear Generating Stations in Durham Region. A formal partnership was established to help OPG source new “career-ready” employees, especially as the reality of demographic-driven employee turnover impacts the Canadian Nuclear industry while offering workforce development for existing OPG employees. In addition, the partnership sees the college work with OPG to review, enhance and maintain the curriculum for related programs in order to help fulfil the need for future personnel at OPG’s sites. Durham College also works with UOIT as part of the partnership to support the ongoing learning needs of OPG employees with OPG making investments in infrastructure, bursaries and equipment to support a high-quality learning experience. Finally, countless Durham College graduates have also gone on to find employment with OPG.

Community

Durham College employees work with dozens of groups and organizations in the community, both in a professional capacity for their jobs and in pursuing personal interests. In fact, college employees spend close to 20,000 hours annually working with non-profit organizations. One of the most highly visible is a partnership between the college and Habitat for Humanity, which sees students in the Construction Carpentry – Sustainable program assist with the building of homes at a project site in Oshawa.

Support Indigenous Students

The Suswaaning Endaajig Aboriginal Student Centre embraces teachings from all First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples. It strives to recognize and support students through various activities and teachings with the assistance of Elders from all backgrounds. The Centre utilizes a holistic approach to education serving Aboriginal students with a focus on their physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual well-being.

Below is a list of services offered through the Aboriginal Student Centre:

  • Aboriginal-specific advocacy, advising and information and referral services to on-campus and external Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal resources.
  • Traditional Elders provide one-on-one counselling sessions and facilitate traditional teachings.
  • Coaching support helps students build resilience and succeed in achieving their goals.
  • Faculty are advised in the review and selection of culturally appropriate learning materials.
  • Development and delivery of program-specific workshops for faculty, students and staff, promoting a culturally safe environment.
  • Facilitates full moon ceremonies.
  • Works with college administration to create policies and procedures acknowledging Aboriginal traditional ways of life to ensure the rights and freedoms of the entire community are respected.
  • Participates in campus and community circle/committees and initiatives, which promotes a collaborative approach to Aboriginal wellness, education and service delivery.
  • A culturally recognizable and inviting environment for Aboriginal learners (a designated Smudge room with all the medicines is available for use).
  • Information sessions on traditional drum-making and other Aboriginal crafts.
  • A variety of Aboriginal resources and computers for students use.
  • Bursary and financial information.

Programs & Services of Interest

Date modified: 2016-10-26