Main Content

May 17, 2018

Exploring virtual reality in and out of the classroom

Today’s virtual reality technology has the potential to enhance the student learning experience in a multitude of ways. The Mohawk College research team wanted to find some of the best ways virtual reality and 360-degree camera technology could help media and entertainment students to create visual content, and to learn about other areas where the technology could be applied. To do that, the research team experimented with using new visual technologies to produce three-dimensional, computer-generated environments through virtual reality and explored 360-degree camera technology to learn about techniques for enhancing learning. The team also reviewed editing software for 360 cameras... Read more
Read more
May 17, 2018

Building a bridge to change: connecting post-secondary teachers and staff with student diversity

The population of post-secondary students is becoming increasingly diverse. Over time, colleges and universities have seen increasing numbers of students from diverse cultural, ethnic, and first-language groups (including Indigenous students). But other types of differences are also becoming more common, like cognitive and neuro diversity in students with autism, Asperger’s and ADHD. Institutions are also more aware of gender diversity, both among different gender identities and also through recognition some gender groups are underrepresented, such as women in engineering and computing. This project hinges on the fundamental notion that educators welcome diversity and embrace the increasing diversity of student population... Read more
Read more
May 17, 2018

Sharing knowledge, sharing hope: a new approach to social service delivery

It’s a paradox of social work that services aimed at helping people get back on their feet and living independent lives have traditionally been “delivered” to them. Their needs are assessed by others, what’s best for them is determined by policies decided far from their day-to-day reality and individual circumstances. However, that’s starting to change, with a new approach known as “co-production” a social innovation where the service provider becomes a catalyst and facilitator rather than the key provider of services. The need for services is not determined by a provider, rather, professionals, and the people and families being served... Read more
Read more
May 17, 2018

Giving young parents a chance to LEAP ahead

Life can be full of challenges for young parents. To help them manage, Ontario Works’ Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) program provides support to people between the ages of 16 and 25 who already have children by helping them finish high school, achieve sustainable employment and become independent and self-reliant. However, some 60 percent of the young adults in the LEAP program who graduate from high school each year don’t plan to continue their education at a post-secondary institution, a choice that can affect their employment options for the rest of their lives. Durham College worked together with the continuing... Read more
Read more
May 16, 2018

A community-built response to improving access to education

Deciding on post-secondary education is a big step that can be particularly difficult for students who’ve grown up in areas with lower socio-economic status. To counter that, Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario has developed “City School by Mohawk,” a community-based initiative that aims to break down barriers to education and employment for residents of some of the city’s struggling neighbourhoods. The goal of City School by Mohawk is to overcome the post-secondary attainment gap that may affect residents of communities struggling with poverty and other causes of marginalization. To do that, it has brought college programming and services directly to... Read more
Read more
May 16, 2018

Evaluating Neighbourhood Policing

Relations between the public and their police are often strained these days — which has made finding a way to defuse tension and build trust a high priority for communities across Canada. Once an effort has been made, however, it’s important to ask if what’s being done is working. That’s why Humber College and the Toronto Police Service are collaborating on an evaluation of the Neighbourhood Policing Program introduced in May 2013. Its goals were to reduce crime and increase the public’s safety and its trust in police. Through the program, special teams of Toronto police officers were assigned to... Read more
Read more
June 22, 2016

Harnessing Fun for Children with Disabilities

It sounds like a dream come true for kids everywhere — your parents want you to play your video game. It’s good for you. Perhaps more surprising is the reason these video games are likely to get parental endorsement — they are designed to get children with cerebral palsy doing their physiotherapy exercises. “We are trying to make cod liver oil more palatable,” Denis Nikitenko joked in an interview. He puts equal emphasis, however, on the other goal he and his partners have in developing the games: improving quality of life for children with cerebral palsy by giving them something... Read more
Read more
June 22, 2016

Worth a Thousand Words

Picture this: women, working to get footholds in a new country, are armed with cameras. What will the pictures they take tell them about the journey they’re on? What will they tell the new country about itself? Choon Lee Chai hopes the photos will fill in details and open up discussion on the programs and services available for immigrant women in a small city in central Alberta. He and his colleagues at Red Deer College and the University of Calgary are using a Community and College Social Innovation Fund grant to find out from immigrant women how those programs meet... Read more
Read more
June 22, 2016

Bonding Children to School, Building Bonds to Their Futures

A solid foundation helps a structure last: it’s true of buildings and it’s true of education. The challenge for educators is to bond children more firmly to the foundation their school and teachers create for them. “Many kids, especially in First Nations, start to lose interest in school between Grade 5 and Grade 8,” says Gwen Machnee, university and research coordinator at Parkland College in Saskatchewan. “That’s when they start skipping, and the more they do, the harder it is for them. School keeps moving on and they get left behind.” That four-year window before high school is the target... Read more
Read more
June 22, 2016

Confronting Loneliness in Crowded Places

They might seem a world apart, busy college students and homeless people, drifting around the downtown streets of a big city, but many share a hidden bond: they are lonely. Researchers in Edmonton are trying to help. A research team from Norquest College is working in partnership with the Edmonton Public Library, to study the impact of loneliness on marginalized people. The project is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council’s Community and College Social Innovation Fund. The project began when Bob Marvin, a social work instructor at Norquest College, asked students in one of his courses to... Read more
Read more